MHA Today | April 24, 2019

April 24, 2019
MHA Today: News for Healthcare Leaders

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April 24, 2019

MHA Today is provided as a service to members of the Missouri Hospital Association. Additional information is available online at MHAnet.


In This Issue
FRA Reauthorization Advances In Senate After Extended Debate
Assistant Physician Bill Creates Alternative Path To Physician Licensure
State Legislators Consider Medicaid Managed Care Reform
DHSS Releases Proposed Hospital Licensing Regulations
Hospitals Sue Over Liver Allocation Policy
SSM Health St. Clare Hospital Hosts Addiction Conference

Advocate
state and federal health policy developments


FRA Reauthorization Advances In Senate After Extended Debate

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon or Rob Monsees

The Missouri Senate gave first-round approval to Senate Bill 29, but only after debate extending past midnight on Tuesday night. There was universal agreement regarding the core of the bill, which reauthorizes the hospital Federal Reimbursement Allowance and the other state provider taxes. However, the legislation is a “must-pass, must-sign” bill because of its importance to the state budget. Accordingly, a cascading series of amendments were debated. From the right of the political spectrum, one amendment would have imposed work requirements on many Medicaid enrollees. From the left, another would have expanded eligibility for Medicaid. In the middle, authorization for a provider tax on managed care plans drew fire as an unwarranted new tax. In the end, the bill was stripped back to its core ― a reauthorization of the provider taxes ― with the duration scaled back from two years to one year. Once the Senate gives its final approval, the bill will move to the House of Representatives.

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Assistant Physician Bill Creates Alternative Path To Physician Licensure

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon or Rob Monsees

A state House committee reviewing House Bill 720 heard conflicting views about the bill’s creation of an alternative path to physician licensure. In 2014, legislators enacted state laws authorizing licensure of “assistant physicians” who had completed a medical degree and passed several medical licensing examinations but had not completed a medical residency. These assistant physicians can provide primary care services under the auspices of a collaborative practice arrangement with a licensed physician. The legislation would allow an assistant physician to be licensed as a physician after five years of assistant physician practice in a collaborative practice arrangement and 100 hours of didactic instruction. It also states they would be eligible to sit for medical specialty board certification or medical fellowships. Also, after 18 months of collaborative practice, an assistant physician could engage in a collaborative practice arrangement with an advanced practice registered nurse or a supervision agreement with a physician assistant. Proponents argued that assistant physicians are trained and capable to provide primary care on par with those fortunate enough to secure and complete a medical residency. Opponents asserted that postgraduate medical training is necessary to ensure quality care and that a collaborative practice arrangement is insufficient to substitute for a medical residency.

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State Legislators Consider Medicaid Managed Care Reform

Staff Contact: Rob Monsees or Bill Anderson

A state House committee reviewed House Bill 247, which would create new standards for Medicaid managed care. The bill reflects many of the Medicaid managed care advocacy stances adopted by the MHA Board of Trustees.

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Regulatory News
the latest actions of agencies monitoring health care


DHSS Releases Proposed Hospital Licensing Regulations

Staff Contact: Sarah Willson

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Bureau of Health Services Regulation released proposed hospital licensure and survey regulations. These regulations are open for public comment until Thursday, May 30. Missouri statute 197.005 states compliance with Medicare Conditions of Participation constitutes compliance with the standards for hospital licensure. Future regulations promulgated by the department must not be duplicative or contradictory to the CoPs. MHA encourages hospitals to review the proposed regulations and provide comment. Please notify Sarah Willson, vice president of clinical and regulatory affairs, of submitted comments or questions regarding the proposed regulations.

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Noteworthy


Hospitals Sue Over Liver Allocation Policy

Staff Contact: Jane Drummond

Potential transplant recipients and several hospitals across the country, including Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University, filed suit against the Department of Health and Human Services and the United Network for Organ Sharing to block a nationwide liver transplant policy. The new policy redraws the map determining how liver donations are geographically distributed. HHS and UNOS claim the policy is necessary to ensure underserved areas receive life-saving organs. The plaintiffs in the suit claim the policy will waste viable organs, resulting in fewer transplants and likely deaths. Senator Roy Blunt also has criticized the policy and threatened to intervene through his role as chair of the appropriations committee that funds HHS.

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Quality and Population Health


SSM Health St. Clare Hospital Hosts Addiction Conference

Staff Contact: Alison Williams

Addiction Medicine and the Mother/Infant Dyad: Beyond Opioids will be hosted by SSM Health St. Clare Hospital on Friday, May 3, and Saturday, May 4. The primary goal of the conference is to provide education and awareness of a national problem impacting the community. Through education, treatment and understanding of addiction as a disease, health care workers bring hope and improved outcomes to the women and families they serve.

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Consider This ...

Falls are a hazard found in many work settings, but construction has the most fatal falls out of all industries and represents 51 percent of all falls nationally.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention