MHA Today | April 17, 2019

April 17, 2019
MHA Today: News for Healthcare Leaders

linkedin twitter facebook
April 17, 2019

MHA Today is provided as a service to members of the Missouri Hospital Association. Additional information is available online at MHAnet.


In This Issue
Senate Committee Approves Hospital Inspections Bill
Senate Committee Hears Hospital Infection Control Legislation
KFF Releases Medicaid Expansion State Fact Sheets
CMS Releases Proposed Payment And Policy Updates To FY 2020 IRF
Washington University Announces Free Or Reduced Cost Medical School

Advocate
state and federal health policy developments


Senate Committee Approves Hospital Inspections Bill

Staff Contact: Ted Wedel, Rob Monsees or Bill Anderson

By a vote of 4-0, the state Senate Health and Pension Committee approved Senate Bill 415. The legislation creates conflict of interest restrictions for state hospital inspectors. State hospital regulators will not inspect a hospital within two years of having been employed by the hospital or its hospital system. It also creates a process for assessing whether an inspector’s personal or business affiliations create bias for or against a hospital. MHA developed and is promoting this portion of the legislation, which is based on a law governing nursing home inspectors.

Back To Top


Senate Committee Hears Hospital Infection Control Legislation

Staff Contact: Ted Wedel, Rob Monsees or Bill Anderson

The state Senate Health and Pensions Committee had a hearing on Senate Bill 435. MHA developed and is promoting this legislation. The legislation exempts hospitals from state infection control reporting obligations if the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services requires reporting of hospital infection data. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services will include a link to CMS infection data on its website. Also, a state antimicrobial stewardship data reporting requirement will become effective when CMS Conditions of Participation require electronic reporting of antibiotic use or resistance. Current state law ties the effective date to federal “meaningful use” regulations.

Back To Top


KFF Releases Medicaid Expansion State Fact Sheets

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon

New state fact sheets released by the Kaiser Family Foundation identify how many uninsured nonelderly adults would become eligible for coverage if the remaining nonexpansion states expanded their Medicaid programs. For each of the 14 states, KFF provides a snapshot with key data for those who would become eligible, including work status, demographic data and location within the state.

If all states were to expand the Medicaid program, 4.4 million uninsured nonelderly adults would become eligible for coverage. In Missouri, 219,000 — or 47 percent — of uninsured nonelderly adults would become eligible.

Back To Top

 

Regulatory News
the latest actions of agencies monitoring health care


CMS Releases Proposed Payment And Policy Updates To FY 2020 IRF

Staff Contact: Andrew Wheeler

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services released proposed updates to the fiscal year 2020 Medicare inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system. The update includes the following proposals.

  • rebase and revise the IRF marketbasket to reflect a 2016 base year
  • replace previously finalized unweighted motor score with a weighted motor score
  • use the concurrent inpatient PPS wage index
  • proposing to change regulations to clarify that the determination as to whether a physician qualifies as a rehabilitation physician is made by the IRF

CMS estimates that the payment and policy updates will increase IRF payments by $195 million. MHA will publish more information, including an issue brief.

Back To Top

 

Workforce News


Washington University Announces Free Or Reduced Cost Medical School

Staff Contact: Dave Dillon

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis announced a new program to reduce the cost of medical school beginning with the 2019-2020 class. The $100 million program will offer free tuition to approximately half of the class, while others will receive scholarship support to significantly reduce tuition costs. The university also will revise its academic programming.

According to Eva Aagaard, M.D., senior associate dean for education and the Carol B. and Jerome T. Loeb Professor of Medical Education, “This is an investment in our students and in our institution, as well as in the health of St. Louis and the greater global community.” Funding for the scholarship program and revised curriculum comes primarily from the School of Medicine, through new funding from its departments, and from the university’s affiliated training hospitals, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Aagaard said.

Back To Top

 


Consider This ...

Although we aren’t always sure why, epilepsy currently affects more than 460,000 children younger than age 18 in the U.S. Picture a school with 1,000 students — at least six students would have epilepsy.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention