MHA Today | February 25, 2019

February 25, 2019

MHA Today: News for Healthcare Leaders

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February 25, 2019

MHA Today is provided as a service to members of the Missouri Hospital Association. Additional information is available online at MHAnet.


In This Issue
DHSS Proposes To Raise Metabolic Testing Fees
DHSS Issues Syphilis Health Advisory
CMS Issues New Strategies To Reduce Opioid Use

What You Need To Know This Week

  • MHA will distribute hospital-specific estimates of state Medicaid DSH allotment reductions slated under federal law to begin Oct. 1, 2019. MHA is advocating for a postponement, which has been enacted four times since 2013.
  • Late last week, the Department of Health and Senior Services released a draft rule outlining the process for qualifying patients and primary caregivers to obtain medical marijuana identification and cultivation cards.

Regulatory News
the latest actions of agencies monitoring health care


DHSS Proposes To Raise Metabolic Testing Fees

Staff Contact: Sarah Willson

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services is proposing to raise the fee for newborn metabolic testing from the current $95 to $155. The proposed rule will be published in the Friday, March 1, Missouri Register. The effective date of the increase would be July 1, 2019. Comments must be submitted by Sunday, March 31. MHA will comment and encourages its members to do so, as well. Questions of or comments to MHA should be directed to Sarah Willson at swillson@mhanet.com.

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DHSS Issues Syphilis Health Advisory

Staff Contact: Sarah Willson or Jackie Gatz

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services issued a Health Advisory on the sustained increase in Syphilis cases in the state. The department warns that the number of Syphilis cases increased 219% since 2012. The advisory includes numerous resources for providers. Questions should be directed to DHSS’ Bureau of HIV, STD and Hepatitis at 573/751-6439, or by email at STDinfo@health.mo.gov.

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Quality and Population Health


CMS Issues New Strategies To Reduce Opioid Use

Staff Contact: Shawn Billings

According to a recent directive released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, guidance is being provided to reduce opioid use in pain management. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ five-point strategy supports practices that will result in fewer opioid prescriptions being provided for pain management. In response to this strategy and along with multiple partnering agencies, CMS issued a bulletin outlining both mandatory and optional policies to reduce opioid prescribing and increase alternatives to opioids for pain management among the Medicaid and CHIP programs.

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Consider This ...

Pregnant women 40 or older have a 10-fold higher risk of having a heart attack. Top heart attack predictors include pregnancy-related complications such as preeclampsia, gestational high blood pressure, and an imbalance of fluids and electrolytes.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention