MHA Today | January 30, 2019

January 30, 2019

 



MHA Today: News for Healthcare Leaders

linkedin twitter facebook
January 30, 2019

MHA Today is provided as a service to members of the Missouri Hospital Association. Additional information is available online at MHAnet.


In This Issue
Legislative Committee Reviews Short-Term Insurance Expansion
State Legislators Review PDMP Legislation
Legislators Push Back On Governor’s Workforce Proposal
State Legislation Tweaks Surprise Billing Law
CMS Updates eCQI Resource Center


UPCOMING SEMINARS
2019 Missouri Health Care Executive Assistants Annual Conference

Thursday, April 4, and Friday, April 5
Camden on the Lake
Lake Ozark, Mo.
Register on or before Friday, March 22.

Advocate
state and federal health policy developments


Legislative Committee Reviews Short-Term Insurance Expansion

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon or Rob Monsees

A Senate committee reviewed Senate Bill 48, which would redefine short-term insurance plans to include coverage with a duration of as much as one year. Currently, short-term coverage must be for less than six months. The expanded short-term plans would be exempt from state laws mandating coverage of particular benefits or services, as well as the requirement to cover preexisting conditions. An MHA memo relays concerns about the legislation.

Back To Top


State Legislators Review PDMP Legislation

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon or Rob Monsees

A state Senate committee held a hearing on legislation to create a state-operated prescription drug monitoring program. This evening, a House version of the proposal will be presented to a House committee. MHA plans to testify in support of both proposals.

Back To Top


Legislators Push Back On Governor’s Workforce Proposal

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon or Rob Monsees

State senators expressed concerns with one of Gov. Parson’s workforce development initiatives. At his recent State of the State address, Parson touted his “Fast Track” proposal. It would offer $22 million to enable those over age 25 to pursue degrees or other credentials in occupations designated as “high-need.” A Senate committee hearing on the legislation revealed bipartisan questions and objections, focusing on lack of specificity, the need for a new program and the role of government in training workers.

Back To Top


State Legislation Tweaks Surprise Billing Law

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon or Rob Monsees

Senate Bill 103 revises a law enacted in 2018 concerning insurer and patient billing and payment standards for out-of-network practitioners in network facilities. The law applies to patients who have an emergency medical condition and their treatment through discharge from the facility. The legislation clarifies that the processes created by the law are mandatory, rather than optional, for practitioners who bill insurers for “unanticipated out-of-network” services. It was presented to a state Senate committee. All of the insurance and health care parties involved in the final negotiations of last year’s legislation testified in support, including MHA, Anthem, BJC Health, the Missouri College of Emergency Physicians and the Missouri State Medical Association.

Back To Top

 

Quality and Population Health


CMS Updates eCQI Resource Center

Staff Contact: Sherry Buschjost

Based on user feedback, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services updated the Electronic Clinical Quality Improvement Resource Center, a one-stop shop for the most current resources to support electronic clinical quality improvement. The new eCQM Tools, Resources & Collaboration, previously named eCQM Tools & Resources, has been revised and redeveloped based on user input. This interactive graphic provides an in-depth overview of the tools, standards and resources used in the various stages of the eCQM measure lifecycle. The Annual Timeline is a new interactive tool that improves awareness of eCQM resources and timeframes for measure developers, implementers and end users to plan and provide feedback looking from a calendar year. It is a general guide for referencing scheduled updates affecting programs that use eCQMs, including eCQM specifications, tools and reporting.

Back To Top

 


Consider This ...

When the body is exposed to the cold for prolonged periods, it begins to lose heat faster than it can produce it. A temperature below 95 indicates an emergency, requiring immediate medical attention.

Source: The New York Times