MHA Today | April 12, 2017

April 12, 2017
MHA Today: News for Healthcare Leaders

twitter linkedin MHA Today is provided as a service to members of the Missouri Hospital Association. Additional information is available online at MHAnet.

In This Issue
Committee Considers, Approves Medical Liability Bills
Task Force To Assess State Boards And Commissions
Bill Addresses Medical Records, Consent To Treatment
Committee Proposes Changes To Stroke, STEMI, Trauma Standards
House Advances Bill On Physician Loan Forgiveness
HIDI HealthStats — Opioid Mortality Research

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state and federal health policy developments


Committee Considers, Approves Medical Liability Bills

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon

A Senate committee has approved House Bill 452 without amendment. The legislation would revise medical liability law to reverse the Jefferson v. Missouri Baptist court ruling. The effect will be to narrow hospital liability for those who are not hospital employees. The committee also reviewed a Senate bill that would establish deadlines for providing notice that a medical malpractice or wrongful death lawsuit has been filed.

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Task Force To Assess State Boards And Commissions

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon

Gov. Eric Greitens has announced the creation of a 12-member task force to assess state boards and commissions, and “identify opportunities to eliminate, consolidate, or modify their structures.” Created by executive order, the group is to complete its work by Tuesday, Oct. 31. A legislative Subcommittee on Boards and Commissions is doing similar work.

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Bill Addresses Medical Records, Consent To Treatment

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon

A Senate committee reviewed House Bill 381, which addresses access to medical records of the deceased. Before approving a new version, the committee removed language that would have revised standards for securing consent to treatment for the incapacitated.

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Committee Proposes Changes To Stroke, STEMI, Trauma Standards

Staff Contacts: Ted Wedel or Sarah Willson

Today, a state Senate committee held a hearing on Senate Bill 495, which would make various changes to standards governing the regulation of stroke, STEMI and trauma centers. The bill was developed by MHA to address problems raised by MHA members. The committee then approved a new version, which MHA supports.

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House Advances Bill On Physician Loan Forgiveness

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon

The state House of Representatives has given first-round approval to House Bill 121, which adds psychiatrists to the list of practitioners eligible to participate in the Health Professional Student Loan program.

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HIDI Tech Connect


HIDI HealthStats — Opioid Mortality Research

Staff Contact: Mat Reidhead

The May edition of HIDI HealthStats explores drug-related deaths among middle-aged, white Missourians. In 2015, two Princeton economists made a startling discovery. For decades, public health advances in the U.S. resulted in life expectancy gains and sharply decreasing mortality rates. This was a well-known trend. What Sir Angus Deaton and Anne Case stumbled upon was that these gains were not equally benefiting all population subgroups. The overall mortality rate for middle-aged, non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. diverged from the downward trend of the previous decades and turned sharply upward in the late 1990s. Moreover, they found that this trend was unique to the U.S. and not experienced in other developed countries, or even by other racial and ethnic groups within the U.S. Appallingly, the study found that if the mortality rate for whites between ages 45 and 54 had continued the same downward trajectory during the previous two decades instead of turning sharply upward, a half a million deaths would have been avoided between 1999 and 2013.

Between 2012 and 2015, just over 1 in 4 drug-induced overdose deaths in Missouri occurred in a hospital setting, while 54 percent occurred in the decedent’s home. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention death certificate data, 12,585 Missourians died from a drug-induced overdose between 1999 and 2015. Similar to the Case-Deaton findings, Missouri saw a dramatic 273 percent increase in the number of overdose deaths during the same period with 294 occurring in 1999 and 1,098 in 2015.

Missouri — the only state in the country without a statewide prescription drug monitoring program — also experienced significantly higher rates of growth for drug-induced overdose deaths compared to the rest of the country. In 1999, Missouri was below the national rate for age-adjusted overdose deaths. By 2006, Missouri had converged with the national rates; however, during the first four years of the great recession the state experienced significant growth and has eclipsed the national death rate for drug overdose every year since 2008. Throughout the entire period, the age-adjusted drug-induced death rate increased by 247 percent in Missouri compared to 153 percent nationally. Read more.

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Consider This ...

Seventy-five percent of new heroin users report that their addiction began by abusing prescription opioids that can typically be tracked by a PDMP.

Source: May 2017 edition of HIDI HealthStats