MHA Today | April 11, 2017

April 11, 2017
MHA Today: News for Healthcare Leaders

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In This Issue
State Legislation Revises Consent To Treatment Standards
State House Approves Helmet Repeal
Opioid Control Bills Advance
JAMA Pediatrics Analyzes Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions

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state and federal health policy developments


State Legislation Revises Consent To Treatment Standards

Staff Contacts: Daniel Landon or Ted Wedel

A Senate committee has reviewed Senate Bill 493. The bill revises standards for securing consent to treatment by those who are incapacitated. The House of Representatives previously passed the legislation as an amendment to another bill, which is slated for Senate committee review later this week.

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State House Approves Helmet Repeal

Staff Contact: Daniel Landon

The House of Representatives has given its final approval to House Bill 576. The legislation would allow most motorcyclists age 21 or older to ride without wearing a helmet, with some caveats concerning experience, training and insurance coverage. It now moves to the Missouri Senate.

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Opioid Control Bills Advance

Staff Contacts: Daniel Landon or Leslie Porth

A Senate committee has approved Rep. Holly Rehder’s House Bill 90, which would authorize a state prescription drug monitoring program. The legislation was approved without amendment. When it is debated by the full Senate, an expected amendment would establish the use of the PDMP as a standard of care, effectively requiring practitioners to use it. Sen. Rob Schaaf has made the mandate a condition of his recently announced support for the legislation, following years of opposition. Also, the House of Representatives approved House Bill 294 and sent the bill to the Senate. It would grant immunity from arrest, prosecution or other penalties for certain drug-related crimes if the evidence was gained in the course of seeking medical assistance for a drug or alcohol overdose.

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Quality and Population Health


JAMA Pediatrics Analyzes Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions

Staff Contact: Jackie Gatz

The Journal of the American Medical Association analyzed pediatric inpatient discharges to determine income inequality on pediatric hospital rates for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions and whether income inequality affects the use of resources — specifically related to conditions where appropriate outpatient care may prevent hospitalization. The 2014 study found that children living in areas of high income inequality have higher rates of hospitalizations for ACSCs. The findings conclude that “Efforts aimed at reducing rates of hospitalizations for ACSCs should consider focusing on areas with high income inequality.”


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Consider This ...

April is Autism Awareness Month. Autism services cost U.S. citizens $236-262 billion annually.

Source: Autism Society